Cooking with Guinness on St. Patty’s Day

Posted on March 16th, 2010

Tomorrow is St. Patrick’s day, a time for gathering with loved ones and enjoying a glass or two of your favorite beer. Many celebrate St. Patty’s day with perhaps the most famous Irish beer, Guinness. It’s a yearly tradition the Beeriety team follows as well. Guinness is not only great on its own, it’s also is great to cook with. Here’s five delicious recipes with Guinness in them to cook tomorrow.

Read Full Story

Five Things You Didn’t Know About Your Beer

Posted on October 1st, 2009

Thanks to their ubiquitous advertising and numerous sponsorship deals, light lagers are by far the most well known beers in America. While everyone knows their catchy jingles and funny commercials there is plenty that the average consumer doesn’t know about light lagers. Today we’re going to take a look at a few things those commercials leave out.

Read Full Story

Style Profile: Irish Dry Stout

Posted on September 29th, 2009

Screenshot

There is probably no style of beer more closely associated with a single brewery more than Irish dry stouts and Guinness. Chances are that many Guinness drinkers can’t name more than six other brewers producing a beer in that style (but if you can name six let us know in the comments section and we’ll send you out some Beeriety swag). It’s true that Guinness has played a key role in establishing the style’s popularity and most recognizable qualities, it’s still a clearly defined style, independent of any particular brewer. With Guinness’s 250th birthday last week we thought we’d take a look today at the style it has made so famous.

Read Full Story

Sorry Michelob, Beer isn’t a sport drink. Stop counting calories.

Posted on July 10th, 2009

For the last few years Michelob Ultra has been oddly promoted as some sort of ‘sport beer.’ Even though a recent study suggests that beer can rehydrate better than water after exercise I don’t think anyone is ditching their Gatorade for beer when heading to the gym.

Michelob Ultra’s tag line of “Lose the carbs. Not the taste.” just doesn’t make much sense if you think about it. The main ingredient in beer is barley after all, which as a grain is almost entirely carbs. This means Michelob is basically trying to simultaneously increase the flavor while decreasing the ingredients, something that is bound to be met with failure.

Miller has also recently gotten in on this quest to have the lowest calorie beer, with  MGD 64 whose commercials seem to suggest that every other beer is wildly rich in calories.

If you look at the facts however this simply doesn’t add up. MGD 64 only has about two and half calories per ounce less than Michelob Ultra, which means 64 calories of it would only be a sip or two less than MGD 64, not the shot that is portrayed in the commercial. The same thing applies when you compare Michelob Ultra to Guinness, which with its nickname “liquid bread” is frequently considered to be an especially heavy and calorie-rich beer, but it only has about two calories more per ounce than Michelob Ultra, which again is the difference of only a sip or two when having a pint of it.

beer calories

The point to take from all this is that yes, some beers have less calories than others but not all that much and quibbling over a few ounces here and there isn’t going to make much of a difference and you’ll lose a great deal of flavor in the process. Despite what Michelob would have you believe, beer simply isn’t a sport drink.